Skip to main content

About your Search

20130801
20130831
SHOW
STATION
MSNBCW 9
MSNBC 6
LANGUAGE
English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
MSNBC
Aug 10, 2013 2:30am PDT
to have a life. >> i actually cut my day at 7:00 now. i used to work as i said, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, but i shut it down now. i am working differently. >> differently and definitely better. >>> devising a growth plan is an essential tool for any small business owner. but being disciplined enough to keep it is the tricky part. let's turn to this week's board of directors. gene marks owns and operates the marks group. he is also a "new york times" columnist. and bill rancic is an entrepreneur, author, talk show host and a reality show star. great to see both of you guys. >> hey, j.j. >> thanks for having us. >> i love when she talks about how she's turning people down. i think that's the hardest when you start a business. she said every opportunity is a sales moment. all you want to do is get people interested. how do you get to the point where you can say no to people? >> well, i think you've got to start working smarter rather than working harder. and i think in the beginning, you take everything you can get and figure it out. the first, you know, year or two, you're feeling your way in the
MSNBC
Aug 4, 2013 4:30am PDT
down. i used to work till 10, 11, 12. i shut it down now. i am working differently. >> differently and definitely better. >>> devising a growth plan is an essential tool for any small business owner, but being disciplined enough to keep it is the tricky part. let's turn to this week's board of directors. gene marx owns and operates the marx group, a company that provides consulting services to small businesses. he's also a business and bill rancic. i love how she says she's turning people down. i think that's the hardest, when you start a business. as she said, every opportunity is a sales moment. all you want do is get people interested. how do you get to the point where you can say no to people? >> i think you've got to work smarter rather than working harder. think in the beginning you take everything you can get and then you figure it out. the first year or two, you're feeling your way in the dark and you don't know what's what. when i started my first business. i don't know about you. then you start realizing this isn't going to fit into where i want to go. but you do it. >> w
MSNBC
Aug 24, 2013 2:30am PDT
." this is a very exciting show for all of us here at "your business" because today marks the start of our eighth season. i want to take a moment to thank all of you for allowing us to be a part of your lives and your businesses. we're kicking off our new season by devoting the entire show today to a topic we get so many questions on. funding for your small business. and that's why we're going to introduce you to the founders of a company that needed some cash. rather than asking for as much money as possible, these entrepreneurs thought long and hard about the best way to grow their business. ♪ >> when you raise money, you need to be very clear about what you're going to do with the money. it's important to know yourself, what your needs are. >> they know a thing or two about looking for investors. >> some of the hardest decisions were, should we go with this investor or this other investor? and who is going to make the better partner? >> i think it goes to what are the goals for funding? >> raising capital for their online business can be a full-time job. >> between doing that and running the
MSNBC
Aug 11, 2013 4:30am PDT
helps us out, taking us step by step along their path and explained how they turned a clever creation made of construction paper and scotch tape into a multimillion dollar business. turning an idea into a marketable profit can seem as simple as a spin of a when will on a child's board game. joanne brewer and christy sterling didn't even seem like players. >> this was the first time we ever did this. it was just a completely new adventure for us. it was just out of our own experience with our daughter. >> they were going into sixth grade and wanted to decorate their locker and there wasn't a lot of cute stuff out there. and so christy went to work and came up with some concepts and here we are. >> it was things i clued together in my kitchen at the table. this was an example of a little bin that was basically just cardboard paper that i grewed together. >> their daughters loved these homemade school locker decorations and so did their friends. >> the phone started ringing from other parents saying, where did you get that stuff? we want it. how do we get it? and we realized there's a ma
MSNBC
Aug 18, 2013 4:30am PDT
the better partner for us in the long run? >> ultimately, what are the goals for the funding? >> as they discovered, raising capital for their online business can be a full-time job. >> between doing that and running a business, it certainly -- it doesn't matter if you raise $2 million, $20 million or $200 million. it's just a long process. >> the founders of luxury men's shirt maker ledbury have closed on two rounds of funding for their four-year-old company. >> people loving the product and coming back. 65% of our customers come back between two and 35 times a year. >> the first round was for $32,000. >> rather than going to one or tw individuals, we actually prednisone it out among probably 28 initial investors. >> it quickly became clear that these entrepreneurs would need a cash infusion to expand the way they wanted. >> probably about the 12 month to 16-month mark. it was sort of the nature of the beast. >> before committing to the process, they considered these questions to make sure ledbury was ready to try new expansion strategies. >> what are the lessons we need to
MSNBC
Aug 25, 2013 4:30am PDT
the core family that runs it, i feel my grandfather left us with that responsibility. that not only do we need to provide an amusement park for the people of ocean city, but we need to provide a return for our shareholders. >> a return that is increasingly tough to provide. tacks have gone up, the cost of maintaining the rides have increased. and prices? well, they can't go up too much. >> we can't pass -- like most businesses can pass their expenses on to the consumer. it's very hard here. because a parent can only afford so much, you know, for a child to ride a ride for three minutes. >> it used to be ten-cent skeeball and the public almost died when i had to switch it to a quarter. >> this place has history. it's hard to change almost anything. it took brooks and christopher an entire year to get their grandfather to start accepting credit cards. >> a lot of people are stuck in their ways. with 100 years, it doesn't matter if a new policy comes out. it's, well, this is how we did it for 88 years. >> small businesses are nimble. they can make decisions, act on them quickly. in this smal
MSNBC
Aug 17, 2013 2:30am PDT
was in the recovery room treating patients and thought the same medication i'm using in the recovery room might work well for a hangover. >> he's made a business out of his idea called hangover heaven. the board certified anesthesiologist with a medical degree from the university of north carolina promises in about 45 minutes he can treat almost 95% of all hangover symptoms. >> physician, nurses, paramedics, firefighters have been used i.v. hydration for decades to resolve hangovers. what i've done is take to it the next level using vitamins and anti-nausea and anti-inflammatories. >> for his business to grow he knew not only did he have to cure a hangover he had to make it convenient. so he renovated an old gospel tour bus into a mobile treatment facility and hit the strip. ♪ roll out ♪ >> the hangover bus will make stops to pick up people and treat them on bus. >> i can treat them on the bus. as soon as they walk on the bus we get their history, vital signs. >> the company quickly found the demand for treatment was too much for just one bus to handle so they also opened a clinic nearby the str
MSNBC
Aug 3, 2013 2:30am PDT
to giving you tips and advice for helping your small business grow. for most of us, when we talk about main street, wie think of it as the heart and soul. and those main street businesses from the hardware store to the barbershop or the local bank, these are what we think of when we think of small business. so how is main street america doing in the face of our country's economic ups and downs? we decided to travel the country to find out. our next stop brundidge, alabama. ♪ sweet home alabama >> i'm in brundidge, alabama, population about 2,000. i'm about half way between montgomery, alabama, and pensacola, florida. 60 years ago, main street here on brundidge was hopping. this was the place people came to shop, convene and hang out. look around now and it's not exactly the same. there are a lot of vacancies here. so what happened? well, the same thing that happened to a lot of towns in america. factories shut down, people lost jobs and then big box stores moved in. but brundigde isn't a ghost town and doesn't intend to be. there are a lot of stores surviving here. so we wanted to know, w
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)